Tjap batik

Tjap (pronounced “chop”) batik is a more “modern” batik method.

Java (Indonesia) is largely given credit for developing this technique that makes it possible for images to be duplicated many times … and fairly quickly.

In the beginning tjaps were carved from wood. Now they are formed with copper strips and welded onto a sturdy steel frame.

These tjaps are made from my own artwork. They were part of my 2010 rayon fabric line for The Batik Butik.

These tjaps are made from Barb’s own artwork. They were part of her 2010 rayon fabric line for The Batik Butik.

Designing for batik

Computers aid with placement and pattern repeats.

A single sketch is scanned into the computer then duplicated many times to replicate what it would look like on fabric.

A single sketch is scanned into the computer then duplicated many times to replicate what it would look like on fabric.

Care must be taken to avoid vertical or horizontal lines where the tjap image repeats. It must fit together like a puzzle.

Care must be taken to avoid vertical or horizontal lines where the tjap image repeats. It must fit together like a puzzle.

 

The artist’s sketch is traced in red ink onto wax paper and marked with a grid.

There is a corresponding grid on the copper frame and the tjap maker duplicates the artwork as he bends and snips the copper strips.

The bits and pieces are then tapped into the copper frame that is later welded to a heavy steel frame. The maximum size for a tjap is 14 inches square.

It can take up to one week to complete a tjap depending on complexity of design.

The artist’s sketch is traced in red ink onto wax paper and marked with a grid. There is a corresponding grid on the copper frame and the tjap maker duplicates the artwork as he bends and snips the copper strips. The bits and pieces are then tapped into the copper frame that is later welded to a heavy steel frame. The maximum size for a tjap is 14 inches square. It can take up to one week to complete a tjap depending on complexity of design.

Several rows of copper strips are placed side-by-side where the image will be solid.

One edge of each strip is snipped (like a comb) and the tynes are bent so melted wax will be held inside the tjap longer and release slower.

As the tjap comes in contact with the fabric melted wax is released.

More wax is needed for the solid areas than for outlines.

Several rows of copper strips are placed side-by-side where the image will be solid. One edge of each strip is snipped (like a comb) and the tynes are bent so melted wax will be held inside the tjap longer and release slower. As the tjap comes in contact with the fabric melted wax is released. More wax is needed for the solid areas than for outlines.

The finished tjap!

The finished tjap!

 

Batik wax

Batik wax is a mixture of bee’s wax and paraffin.

Batik wax is a mixture of bee’s wax and paraffin.

A tjap rests on a felt pad as wax melts and heats to the desired temperature (so it will absorb through to the wrong side of the fabric).

A tjap rests on a felt pad as wax melts and heats to the desired temperature (so it will absorb through to the wrong side of the fabric).

Dyeing the fabric

In the batik factory we visit fabric is dyed by rolling back and forth through a dye vat until the desired color is achieved. It must then be “fixed” so the color stays vibrant.

 

 

In the batik factory that we visit, fabric is dyed by rolling back and forth through a dye vat until the desired color is achieved.

It must then be “fixed” so the color stays vibrant.

 

 

 

A tour guest tries tjapping rayon batik.

A tour guest tries tjapping rayon batik.

 

Pre-dyed, tjapped fabric gleaming from the wax that has sealed in the blue color. Next it will be either dyed darker or bleached to produce a dark image and light background.

 

Pre-dyed, tjapped fabric gleaming from the wax that has sealed in the blue color.

Next it will be either dyed darker or bleached to produce a dark image and light background.

Wax applied by hand… “Secret Weapon”

 

A bundle of straw is dipped into hot wax…

Loading the brush with wax.

…then tapped against a stick to spray wax onto the fabric.

Wax applied by hand…“Secret Weapon”

The wax seals in the base color much as a tjap would.

 

 

The wax seals in the base color much as a tjap would.

 

Wax is removed with boiling water.

No chemicals are used and the wax can be re-used.

Wax is removed with boiling water. No chemicals are used and the wax can be re-used.

 

The color sealed in by the wax is revealed.

The color sealed in by the wax is revealed.

Fabric is often over-dyed to achieve a particular look and it’s always manipulated beforehand in Benny’s factory.

Fabric is often over-dyed to achieve a particular look and it’s always manipulated beforehand in Benny’s factory.

Another manipulation technique: pleating

 

Another manipulation technique: pleating.

 

A dyed-to-match coordinate for the batik is possible by leaving some pre-dyed fabric free of wax.

A dyed-to-match coordinate for the batik is possible by leaving some pre-dyed fabric free of wax.

Wet fabric is hung on tiny nails to dry This is part of a fabric order for The Batik Butik… It is rayon designed primarily for apparel sewing… Some dyes require the sun to mature them which poses a challenge during the 6-month rainy season.

 

Wet fabric is hung on tiny nails to dry. This is part of a fabric order for The Batik Butik. It is rayon designed primarily for apparel sewing.

Some dyes require the sun to mature them which poses a challenge during the 6-month rainy season.

 

 

The fabric runs through a drum dryer to warm the fibers before hand-bolting it.

The fabric runs thru a drum dryer to warm the fibers before hand-bolting it.

hand-bolting fabric

 

 

Hand-bolting the fabric.

The late Benny Gunawan: dye technician and the “brains” behind the factory (also known as “The Bali Lama”).

And here is the late Benny Gunawan…dye technician and the *brains* behind the factory (also known as “The Bali Lama”)